Meetings

Guests are always welcome at our meetings!  They are held on the first Wednesday of the month (excluding holidays) at 7:30 PM at the Oxnard Performing Arts Center (map below).  The format includes an educational presentation, followed by refreshments, and a short business meeting.

Wednesday, October 4th

Pink Halite – Bacteria in the brine

Join us Aaron J. Celestian, Ph.D., of the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles, gives us the latest research that is being conducted at Searles Lake, CA.

Pink halite is more than a pretty rock salt.  Here is a look at why Trona is such an unique place. Research at Trona is being used as a model for astrobiology and searching for life on Mars

 

 

Clear Creek National Recreation Area

Notice to Rockhounds! H.R. 1913: Clear Creek National Recreation Area and Conservation Act has passed another legislative hurdle and is one more step closer to becoming the “Law of the Land”. We, as Rockhounds, can have a voice in whether Recreational Rockhounding will be allowed in the final draft of the bill and included in the Clear Creek Management Plan being generated by the BLM. The bill does recognize “Rock and Mineral Collecting” as a recreation activity to be addressed in the Management Plan.

Now, the question, proposed to All Rockhounds, is there anything worth collecting within the proposed Clear Creek Recreational Area, are there specific collecting areas that need to be addressed, is it worth the time and effort for Rockhounds to get involved to protecting the Rockhound’s right to the collecting of Rocks and Minerals on Public Lands for Personal non commercial use?

The Latest information on Clear Creek National Recreational Area and Conservation Area Act is available on the ALAA Website on the California Page. American Lands Access Association, Inc. www.amlands.org

Whether Recreational Collecting within the CCNRA is allowed is up to you and your voice as the Recreational Rockhound!

Death Valley National Park Fossil Thieves

$1,000 Reward – Death Valley National Park

Fossil Thieves stole several fossilized footprints, which had been left in a lakebed by mammals and birds, were missing. Now, Ryan F. Mandelbaum reports for Gizmodo, the National Park Service is asking for the public’s help in identifying a group of backpackers who may have information on the ancient tracks.  In a statement, the National Park Service released the photos of three men who might have witnessed the crime or have knowledge about the disappearance of the footprints. Investigators are offering an award of up to $1000 “for information leading to the identification, arrest, and conviction of those responsible,” the statement reads. According to Mandelbaum, investigators are planning to interview visitors who frequented the Park at the time of theft, in the hopes that someone will be able to provide valuable clues.

Destroying—or pilfering—the property of national parks is prohibited by law. “It’s illegal to collect fossils, rocks, or anything else in National Parks,” Park Superintendent Mike Reynolds said in a statement about the fossil thefts. “The purpose of National Parks is to conserve the landscape and everything it contains for the next generation. I ask that visitors come and enjoy all there is to see, and to leave it unimpaired for others to enjoy.”

The National Park Service has asked anyone with information about the stolen fossils to call the Investigative Services Branch at 1-888-653-0009.

Oxnard Gem & Mineral Show
November 18th & 19th 2017

Saturday:   9:00 AM – 5:00 PM
Sunday:    10:00 AM – 4:00 PM

Free Admission
Free Parking
Free Hourly Door Prizes
Food Available On Site

Exhibitor Form

 

The Oxnard Gem & Mineral Society meets at the:

Oxnard Performing Arts Center
Thousand Oaks Room
800 Hobson Way
Oxnard, California 93030